S

&
B
T
e
c
h
n
o
l
o
g
i
e
s

is now providing

a simple way to

Precision Agriculture

Increase

Yields

Profits

Efficiency

ORCHARDS

CORN

SOYBEAN

VIRTUALLY ANY CROP

24 Acre Soybean Field

2D Map

Plant Health Map

The 2D map on the left is of a local 24 acre soybean field. The map on the right is the same field viewing the plant health map. The arrows designate areas that require further analysis.

Four or five years ago, if you had asked most agriculture professionals about using drones on the farm, you probably would have gotten some strange looks. Agriculture is one of the fastest-growing markets in the commercial drone industry today. As fertilizer specialist Rob Eggert puts it, using a drone “is like being able to see your farm from a 10,000-foot altitude, but also being able to zoom in to two inches above the plants.” Today’s drone solutions let farmers detect crop health issues, accurately assess losses after a major weather event, and even generate variable rate prescriptions that can save some serious cash by limiting labor and resources.

An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), commonly called a drone, is quickly becoming an indispensable tool to help you become more efficient in the field, and make more informed crop management decisions. Over the past few years, a growing ecosystem of ag-specific drone solutions has emerged, making it possible to put aerial data to work in new and exciting ways, ranging from detecting crop damage to analyzing stand counts. 

In the world of agriculture, timing is everything. Diseases and invasive species spread fast, but in the days—and in some cases, weeks — it takes to schedule and process imagery taken from a manned aircraft or satellite, what began as a small problem can spread to something much larger. Drones, on the other hand, give you a high-resolution map of your field in a matter of minutes. Powerful plant health tools allow you to visualize issues and make decisions. No more guesswork or costly waiting periods. Just actionable data on plant health and crop stress.

So how exactly can a drone map tell you anything about the health of your crops? In short: healthy plants reflect light differently than unhealthy plants. Plants that are healthier tend to reflect more green light than red light, which is why they look green. Plants also reflect near-infrared light that is invisible to the naked eye but can be detected with near-infrared sensors.

That sick feeling in the pit of your stomach when one of your crops doesn’t emerge as expected? For many growers, there’s nothing worse. Except maybe the feeling you get from having to make, at best, an educated guess about the right course of corrective action. And let’s face it, that’s all ground scouting is: an educated guess. It’s useful to a point, but it’s an imperfect science with a high margin of error.

Drone maps, combined with powerful analysis tools, replace traditional scouting methods by delivering you a comprehensive set of aerial data on your entire field. No more guesswork or extrapolating. In a matter of hours, you can get an accurate classification of the problem and use it to make the most informed decision about a course of action.  

In addition to evaluating crop emergence, drone maps can be used to monitor the transplant of seasonal row crops like tomatoes. Not only are drone maps considerably faster and less labor intensive compared to ground scouting, but with machine learning to lean on, you know you will get consistent, trustworthy results. Agremo’s user-friendly plant count reports make it easy to interpret your results.

Drone data is a powerful tool to help you visualize your fields. But it’s always important to put boots on the ground to verify your findings and to incorporate other pieces of information, like field history, into the information you gather from your drone maps. Using your geotagged map, it is easy to pinpoint areas of a field that need further inspection up close.

Lurking just beneath the surface of every growing season is this stark reality: at the end of the day, mother nature rules the field. One major weather event, or an unseasonably rainy year, can decimate a crop and leave you with considerable losses to bear. Aerial imagery helps farmers quantify the damage quickly so that action can be taken to mitigate the loss.

Assess Damage After a Storm

With heavy winds and/or exceptional rainfall we can help the farmer assess the damage. A plant health map will give you a complete picture of the loss, instead of relying on ground scouting which could easily have missed catching large portions of the downed crop.

Negotiate Fair Crop Loss Percentages

In situations of extreme crop loss, it’s often time to call a crop insurance adjuster. But adjusters only have time to walk small sections of a damaged field, so gaining an accurate picture of the loss can be difficult. With the detailed information provided by a drone map, an adjuster can take a second look at targeted areas and potentially offer a far higher loss percentage. 

One of the best things about drones is that they allow you to analyze issues in real time, as they happen. But those same drone maps can also enable you to make long-term decisions and engage in advanced crop management.

If you only plan to have your fields mapped during the growing season, you might want to reconsider. From scouting for weeds to assessing drainage tiles, growers are increasingly using drones as an indispensable, year-round field management tool.

Assess Irrigation Systems and Drainage Tiles 

Before the ground freezes, chances are you’ll spend time repairing drainage tiles and optimizing irrigation systems. Why not make your work more efficient, and more effective, by mapping the field? A bare earth map is a great way to catch drainage and irrigation issues early, before they turn into bigger problems next growing season.

Scan Soil to Detect Pre-Season Issues

As spring arrives and planting approaches, it’s  a good idea to map your bare field one last  time. A pre-season barren earth map, combined  with targeted ground-truthing, can help you understand what pests and weeds have come up as a result of heavy rains or severe weather.

Use Maps to Plan for the Next Growing Season

Reviewing maps from past growing seasons is a valuable tool to help with planting plans for the year ahead. Spot trends by using your drone maps to visualize crop emergence and plant health over time, then compare this with historical information on things like soil conditions and yields. 

Prepare for the Busy Season with a Flight Calendar

Flying at regular intervals creates a consistent record of what a field looks like over time and gives you more information to work with when it comes to making those big, mid-season decisions. How often you fly is going to depend on your crops, the size of your fields, their distance from your central location, and your specific data needs. But regardless of how often you plan to fly, if you head into the busiest months with a pre-established calendar, you’ll be more likely to stay consistent even when things get busy.

About Us

Services

We capture aerial imagery which is used to create maps, 3D models, and reports that allow businesses to save time, guide decisions, reduce risk, and increase their bottom line. The layers generated from the aerial images are listed below. Within each layer there are annotation and measurement tools (distance, area measurement, and volume calculation). 


Map Layers

2D Map - You can think of the 2D orthomosaic map as a birds-eye view of your area of interest.

Plant Health - Plant Health is a tool specifically targeted towards agriculture. The main purpose of this layer is to allow you to explore your agricultural data even more deeply.

Elevation - The elevation layer provides the digital surface model information used to measure and understand the elevations of your map.

3D Model - The 3D model layer is a great interactive tool that visualizes your area of interest in a different space.


 

Reports & Analyses

What are drone-based stand counts?
 

Stand counts analyze the number of plants or crops on a field or a specific area on the field. Agremo stand counts show two different numbers:

  • The exact number of plants or crops on your field

  • How this number is performing compared to the planned number of plants or crops (in percent and in plants).

The planned number is also referred to as the recommended set, and you enter it prior to submitting your request. It refers to the number of plants you have been expecting per acre, hectare or square meter. If you don’t have any numbers on the expected number of plants, a standardized value can be entered, which might, however, affect the accuracy of the report.

Here’s an example of what the Agremo stand count report tells you: You expect to get around 240,000 plants on your potato field and enter this as the recommended set. You submit your stand count analysis, which then reveals that you have a total number of 182,402 potatoes of your field. This means that the difference between the counted number of plants and the planned number of plants is 24% under the norm, which is close to 57,598 plants.

If you want to count your plants without entering a recommended set, you might want to request a plant population report instead. Plant population reports will provide you the number of plants without any additional comparisons.

Use stand counts to:

  • Evaluate plant emergence and germination. Spot areas with potential crop loss in time and decide whether or not to replant
  • Evaluate seed quality
  • Analyze the number of plants at the beginning and at the end of the growing season
  • Evaluate how effective replanting measures were
  • Know exactly how many plants you will be able to harvest (and sell)
  • Plan harvest and yield-related processes (logistics, resources)
     

When is the best time to use drone-based stand counts?

Stand counts come in handy for early and late season management decisions.

Early season: plant emergence, seed quality, planting date evaluation, overall plant performance

Late season: yield and harvest planning, yield estimation

What are drone-based plant population reports?
 

Plant population reports tell you the exact number of plants or crops on your field or on a specific area on your field. They are similar to stand count reports, which calculate the number of plants and crops as well as the percentage and the number of missing plants and crops (compared to the results you expected). But as opposed to stand counts, plant population reports show you the number of plants or crops without comparing it to other values.

Plant population reports are ideal for counting perennial plantations, orchards or similar field types. As with all Agremo reports, plant population reports can be used with all plants and crops, as long as they are at least 10 cm/4 in above ground. Another important point is to enter the so-called recommended set when submitting your analysis, which refers to the number of plants you have been expecting per acre, hectare or square meter. If you don’t have any numbers on the expected number of plants, a standardized value can be entered, which might, however, affect the accuracy of the report. 

Just like stand counts, plant population reports can be used to:

  • Evaluate plant emergence and crop population responses
  • Evaluate seed quality
  • Spot areas with potential crop loss in time to allow later replanting
  • Evaluate how effective replanting measures were
  • Know exactly how many plants you will be able to harvest (and sell)
  • Plan harvest and yield-related processes (logistics, resources).

When is the best time to use drone-based plant population reports?

Stand counts come in handy for early-season and late-season management decisions.

Early season: plant emergence, seed quality, planting date evaluation, overall plant performance

Late season: yield and harvest planning, yield estimation

What are drone-based plant stress reports?
 

Plant stress reports identify the percentage and the exact location of areas with stress. In this context, “stress” refers to plants that have not emerged into healthy plants, areas without plants, areas with diseases, drought or other yield-limiting factors. Essentially, you get a map with all problem-causing areas of your field. And to put a name on these problem areas, you can perform further Agremo analyses (weed analyses, pest analyses etc.).

Just like other Agremo reports, the results from plant stress reports are shown using three different colors: green areas refer to good results and no stress, yellow areas refer to areas with potential stress, and red areas point to areas with stress.

Plant stress reports can be used to:

  • Monitor and maintain your overall crop performance ratio to avoid unpleasant surprises at the end of the growing season
  • Spot areas with potential stress in time to allow timely corrective measures
  • Evaluate plant emergence, germination rates and crop population responses
  • Enhance your yield rate and fully utilize your soil’s potential

When is the best time to use drone-based plant stress reports?

Performing plant stress reports is particularly useful during mid-season and late-season tasks.

Mid-season tasks: spot potential crop loss and stress determine the underlying root cause in time, regular plant monitoring

Late-season tasks: pre-harvest monitoring

What are drone-based weed analyses?
 

Agremo weed analyses identify the percentage and the exact location of weed-infested areas on your field. And to turn your field’s data into relevant and actionable information, weed analyses are always conducted in close collaboration with professional agronomists.

To get conclusive results, it’s important to upload high-resolution images. Having high-quality images allows us to provide you with results that go beyond the mere analyses of differences in color. Additionally, Agremo Weed Analyses provide you with the exact georeferenced positions of the identified weeds.

Weed analyses can be used to:

  • Spot weed-infested areas in time and before they affect your current yield goal
  • Optimize weed control measures by applying the right amount of herbicide on the right spots
  • Identify the precise location of weed-infested areas for more effective treatments

When is the best time to use drone-based weed analyses?

Weed analyses can be performed throughout the season as part of the regular crop monitoring cycle.

What are drone-based pest analyses?
 

Do you have a problem with pest infestations caused by insects, mice, snails or other organisms? Agremo pest analyses can help. Send us your 2D map, request a pest analysis and tell us about the kind of problem you have, just like you would do when you go see a doctor. We then send you the exact location of all problem areas, which allows you to take yield-saving corrective measures.

The reason why Agremo pest analyses are so effective?

One of the reasons drone data is a very effective way to spot pest is that the entire surface is analyzed, which includes the ground as well as the plants and crops. And to make sure you obtain relevant and actionable data, our pest analyses are conducted in close cooperation with professional agronomists.

Agremo pest analyses can be used to:

  • Identify the precise location and area size of pest infestations
  • Optimize pest control measures
  • Spot pest infestations before they affect your current yield goal

When is the best time to use drone-based pest analyses?

Pest analyses are performed during mid-season and late-season tasks as part of the regular plant and crop monitoring cycle in order to make sure your plants and crops are healthy during the entire growth cycle.

What are drone-based plant disease analyses?
 

Agremo plant disease analyses identify the percentage and the exact location of plant diseases caused by viruses, fungi or bacteria.

Agremo closely examines your plants and crops by analyzing various visual reactions, such as changes in colors or the percentage of missing leaves. It’s important to us that your analysis provides you with accurate and actionable insights on your plant’s health, which is why we conduct plant disease analyses in close cooperation with professional agronomists.

Agremo plant disease analyses can be used to:

  • Identify the precise location and size of problem areas
  • Optimize treatments and preventive measures (fungicide, insecticide etc.)
  • Spot diseases before they affect your current yield goal

When is the best time to use drone-based plant disease analyses?

Plant disease analyses are performed during mid-season and late-season tasks as part of the regular plant and crop monitoring cycle in order to make sure your plants and crops are healthy during the entire growth cycle.

What are drone-based water stress analyses?
 

Agremo water stress analyses identify the percentage and the exact location of irrigation problems, such as standing water or drought areas.

Drone data is a very effective way to spot water stress, as the entire surface is analyzed, which includes standing water areas as well water deficiencies of plants and crops. And to make sure you obtain relevant and actionable data, our water stress analyses are conducted in cooperation with professional agronomists.

Agremo water stress analyses can be used to:

  • Spot irrigation problems before they affect your plant’s performance
  • Identify the precise location of problem areas
  • Adjust your irrigation system based on the actual needs of your plants and crops

When is the best time to use drone-based Water Stress analyses?

Water stress analyses can be performed throughout the season as part of the regular plant and crop monitoring cycle. Regular water stress analyses let you see whether your watering system is providing your plants and crops with a sufficient amount of water.

What are drone-based flowering estimators?
 

Agremo flowering estimators tell you the percentage of plants which have reached the flowering stage. Depending on the plant and crop you are analyzing you also obtain data on their current flowering stage.

Seasoned farmers know that flowering levels of plants or crops on the same field can vary. Drone data is a great alternative to traditional measures which offer only estimates of a small part of your field. Drone data gives you accurate numbers on the flowering areas on your field.

Agremo flowering estimators can be used to:

  • Determine the best time for harvesting and swathing
  • Optimize pest control measures: certain pesticides and fungicides need to be applied during a specific flowering stage in order to be fully effective
  • Perform yield estimations and estimate biomass

When is the best time for a flowering analysis?

Flowering analyses can be performed during mid-season tasks to optimize pest control measures and perform yield estimations, and during late-season tasks, if you’d like to determine the optimum time for harvesting and swathing.

Eagle eye reports let you create a list view of all points of interest on your field.

Eagle eye reports can be used to:

  • Point out and mark points of interest on your map such as trees, rocks, irrigation systems etc. with their exact georeferenced location (longitude, latitude)
  • Calculate the exact distance between specific points on your map, such as roads, plant and row distance, distance between fields etc.
  • Determine the size of areas on your field, such as ponds, problematic areas, arable areas and many more

When is the best time to use eagle eye reports?

Eagle eye reports offer you the possibility to visually depict points and areas on your field throughout the year.

What are the benefits of eagle eye reports?

Eagle eye reports help you to:

  • Obtain a detailed map of all points of interest
  • Have the exact georeferenced location and size of all points of interest
  • Determine the size of arable land
  • Create a visual plan for your entire field

Examples & Use Cases

Drone-based analyses are one of the most advanced ways of obtaining crucial crop data and maximizing yield performance. No wonder over 100.000 farmers all over the world are opting for drone-based analyses! Compared to manual work, drone data is much more accurate. And what might be even more important is that is saves a lot of time: within a single day, your drone can capture several hundreds of acres. This lets you analyze every inch of the field in a matter of hours!

Why it’s important to have quick insights about every inch of the field

Diseases in corn, for example, can occur at any time during the growing season and have an enormous impact on your crop’s performance. Gray leaf spot, various forms of rust or Physoderma brown spot are just a few of them. And when the problem is there, the grower needs to react quickly. See the corn mapping calendar below to find out when to perform which analysis for optimum crop performance.

With traditional scouting methods, it’s virtually impossible to get accurate data on the entire field - walking the whole field often takes too much time. This is why farmers decide to make estimations so that they have at least a vague idea about the status quo. With drone data, scouting becomes faster, much more accurate and you are able to take the guesswork out of it.

Powerful drone-based corn stand counts

Diseases are not the only thing growers are able to fight with the help of drone data. Drone-based stand counts are a fantastic way to pinpoint areas of potential yield loss and take corrective measures during the growing season.

 

Example reports & Corn Mapping Calendar

 Stand Count Report • Plant Stress Report • Water Stress Report • Pest Stress Report • Plant Disease Report

corn mapping calendar

Wheat and barley have been among the top 10 crops users analyze for quite a while. This comes as no surprise, as there is a lot of valuable information barley and wheat farmers get from drone-based analyses.

Thanks to drone-based stand counts for example, it is possible to:

  • Spot potential crop loss areas and use this information to decide whether or not a replant is profitable
  • Evaluate plant emergence and germination
  • Evaluate seed quality
  • Track crop progress throughout the season
  • Evaluate how effective replanting measures were
  • Determine if harvest will be as successful as planned
  • Plan harvest in terms of logistics and resources

But there is more to it than just stand counts. Just like corn, wheat and barley are prone to diseases, weed and other yield-limiting factors throughout the growing season. Once the problem source has been detected, drone-based weed, disease or stress analyses can help you spot infested areas before the affect your yield goal or optimize treatment.

Example reports & Mapping Calendar

 Winter Wheat Stand Count • Wheat Weed Stress (Black Grass) • Wheat Plant Stress  • Barley Stand Count 

wheat barley mapping

Common soybean diseases like soybean rust, purple seed stain or Cercospora leaf blight can cause severe leaf tissue loss, lighter seeds and may affect the plant’s quality and marketability.

With drone-based disease analyses, growers get full insights into which areas are affected, allowing them to accurately assess damages perform localized measures.

Drone-based stand counts are another great data source for soybean farmers.

Stand counts allow them to evaluate plant performance, seed quality, harvest potential and help them decide whether or not it would make sense to perform a replant.

soybeans

Example reports & Soybean Mapping Calendar

 Stand Count Report • Pest Stress Report

soybean mapping

Sugar beets are one of the crops that are suitable for almost all of the available analyses, including stand counts, weed and disease analyses.

Disease analyses have particular value for sugar beet growers. Because once the disease is here, growers need quick answers: Is there enough time to apply treatment? How much of the field is affected and how much fungicide will I have to apply? How much will the treatment cost? These are all questions the plant disease analysis can help with.

Sugar beet mapping

Sugarcane growers can benefit from drone data and analyses during various stages of the growing cycle: germination, tillering and growth.

During the germination stage, weed analyses can help growers determine which areas are affected and how much pesticide they will need.

Once the growers move on to tillering, they need to know how the plants are progressing. With the help of stand counts, growers can determine the exact number of plants, which tells them whether or not they are on the right track at this particular moment.

Besides this, plant stress analyses help growers spot low-performing analyses. And if a particular problem is detected, they can analyze the matter further with weed analyses, disease analyses or even pest analyses.

Before harvest comes up, growers should make sure that their plants stay as healthy as possible. At this point, plant stress analyses are a great way to stay up to date about the current plant performance.

 Stand Count Report • Weed Stress Report

sugar cane mapping

Pest infestations and diseases are among the biggest challenges potato growers have to face, especially during tuber initiation.

 Stand Count Report • Water Stress Report

Potato mapping calendar

Similar to corn growers, canola growers are able to obtain very powerful information from stand counts. With the information from stand counts, canola growers can:

  • Spot potential crop loss areas
  • Evaluate plant emergence and germination
  • Evaluate seed quality
  • Track crop progress throughout the season
  • Evaluate how effective replanting measures were
  • Determine if harvest will be as successful as planned
  • Plan harvest in terms of logistics and resources

Another powerful drone-based analysis canola growers can benefit from is the flowering estimator. WIth the help of this analysis, canola growers are able to determine the proper time for swathing and harvesting. This decision is usually a tricky one, as hot and dry weather conditions may cause rapid seed color changes, which is vital to choosing a proper swathing and harvest time. With the help of this report, growers are able to track the current state of the crop in every part of the field and obtain detailed information within a few hours only.

 

Some of the drone-based analyses sunflower growers can benefit from are weed analyses, stress analyses, disease analyses and flowering analyses.

Weed analyses let sunflower growers see the precise size and location of infested areas. Armed with this information, growers can improve pesticide and fungicide usage and thus avoid yield loss.

Stress analyses show the size and location of problem areas - problems can be diseases, weeds, pest or any other kind of drawback which results in visible changes, such as changes in leaf color. Similar to this, disease analyses show the size and location of areas with diseases. Both of these analyses help sunflower growers maintain the desired crop performance ratio and react quickly and effectively.

Another very useful analysis for sunflower growers is the drone-based flowering analysis, which helps them determine the best possible harvesting data. With the data from the flowering analysis, growers get detailed information on the current growing stage. Based on this, is is quicker and easier to determine when to harvest the crops for maximum profit.


sunflower mapping